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Endless reasons why you should always have CHIA SEEDS in your kitchen and add it to your food

Endless reasons why you should always have CHIA SEEDS in your kitchen and add it to your food

Chia seeds are among the healthiest foods in your diet. They are loaded with nutrients, with few calories. Chia seed are tiny black seeds from the plant Salvia Hispanica, which is related to the mint. Chia seeds are an important food for the Aztecs and Mayans back in the day. Today, it is recognized as a superfood and is considered a nutrient-dense food due to this fact: 28 grams (about 2 tablespoons) supplies 137 calories and one gram of digestible carbohydrate. If you subtract the fiber (most of which does not end up as usable calories for your body- Chia seeds only contain 101 calories per 28 grams. This makes them one of the world's best sources of several important nutrients, calorie for calorie, therefore, it's a potent nutrient-dense food. Many reasons why you should eat chia seeds Chia seeds are a whole-grain food, usually grown organically, they're non-GMO, naturally free of gluten The high fiber and protein content in chia seeds may help you lose weight High in omega-3 fatty acids and various micronutrients. Chia seeds ae loaded with antioxidants High in many important bone nutrients such as calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium May help reduce blood sugar levels and chronic inflammation How to incorporate in your diet? • Can be eaten raw: Whole or ground • Soaked in juice, smoothies or water • Added to any food My favourite way to eat chia seed? Our household loves chia seeds. I can actually be an entire meal. For ease of digestion, we like to soak the seeds with a bit of water for about 30 minutes. It seems to go faster when placed in the fridge. Although, if I'm in a hurry, I will soak them for only 5-10 minutes. The longer the seeds are soaked, and the more water you add, the thicker and jellyer the seeds will become. In the photo above: - 2 tablespoons of chia seeds soaked in water - Cut fruits; pears, raspberries and bananas - Topped with coconut milk - Very often, I will add Hemp Heart Seeds (from Costco) to create a morning cereal A 28 grams serving of chia seeds contains Fiber: 11 grams. Protein: 4 grams. Fat: 9 grams (5 of which are omega-3s). Calcium: 18% of the RDI. Manganese: 30% of the RDI. Magnesium: 30% of the RDI. Phosphorus: 27% of the RDI. They also contain a decent amount of zinc, vitamin B3 (niacin), potassium, vitamin B1 (thiamine) and vitamin B2. Source: healthline.com

10 reasons why you should eat green beans regularly

10 reasons why you should eat green beans regularly

Green beans contain many essential nutrients for the body, so they are often used in many different dishes. But they have more benefits than that. Green beans contains a large amount of trace elements and vitamins necessary for the body such as calcium, protein, iron, potassium, magnesium, folic acid, vitamins A, C, K, B6 at the same time low sodium. A cup of boiled green beans will provide about 29% of the daily amount of vitamin A, but it contains very few calories, fat and especially no cholesterol. In particular, green beans also contain carotenoids, particularly beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin, which act as important antioxidants for the body. 10 benefits of green beans for your health 1. Provide energy  If you want to add iron to your body, you may think of green beans as many studies show that green beans are foods containing twice the amount of iron compared to spinach. Iron is an important source of minerals for movement in the body, specifically as the process of transporting oxygen from the lungs to feed the cells in the body. Therefore, when you feel tired, tired, and lack of energy, you should immediately use green beans in dishes. Green beans are a type of food that contains twice the amount of iron compared to spinach, which helps the body quickly regain energy. It should be used immediately in dishes. 2. Strengthen cardiovascular health Green beans are foods containing large amounts of calcium and flavonoids, so they are effective for cardiovascular protection. Thanks to the abundant flavonoids inherent, soya bean has extremely good anti-inflammatory properties, helps to reduce the thrombotic activities of the cell, while preventing the formation of blood clots in arteries. 3. Good for the eyes Carotenoids in the green beans play an important role in preventing macular degeneration. On the other hand, the lutein and zeaxanthin found in green beans also help maintain eye health, making the eyes healthier. Carotenoids in the green beans play an important role in preventing macular degeneration of the eyes, helping maintain effective vision. 4. Contains antioxidants Like other vegetables like tomatoes, carrots... green beans also contain many antioxidants to help prevent and protect the body from the attack of free radicals, minimizing the risk of acquiring. diseases such as cancer, heart... Therefore, green beans become foods recommended for regular use in dishes. 5. Help prevent colon cancer Green beans are a high-fiber food, so consuming green beans will help the digestive system work more easily, while reducing the digestive process, making bowel movements softer. Thus helps prevent colon cancer effectively. The fiber in green beans will help the digestive system work easier, while reducing the digestive process. Thus helps prevent colon cancer effectively. 6. Strengthen your bones Calcium is found in green beans in amounts that can improve and protect the growth of the skeletal system, helping the body to escape osteoporosis. At the same time, the amount of vitamins A and K contained in green beans also helps promote bone growth, helping bones stay strong. 7. Treat of stomach and intestinal problems Did you know with only 110g of green beans but can provide your body with up to 15% of the daily fiber. The regular addition of fiber will help the process of digestion - you will no longer encounter constipation or flatulence. With 110g of green beans but can give your body up to 15% of the daily fiber. 8. Prevent infection The benefits of green beans also help prevent infections when Niacin and Thiamine are the two compounds in green beans that help prevent infections in the body. At the same time, the vitamins B and C in green beans are also essential nutrients that help the body fight off the attack of tons of infections. 9. Prevent birth defects Green beans are considered to be a great source of folate, which is essential for DNA synthesis. Therefore, experts recommend that pregnant women should use plenty of green beans during pregnancy to prevent birth defects. Green beans contain a lot of folate necessary for cell division and DNA synthesis should be recommended for pregnant women to prevent disability for children. 1 10. Help with weight loss In the composition of green beans usually have very few calories and fat, and no cholesterol harmful to health. On the other hand, thanks to the abundance of fiber, regularly using bean green beans will help the body quickly improve the metabolism to prevent symptoms of bloating and control weight effectively.

22 Best tips on healthy eating

22 Best tips on healthy eating

It’s a natural desire to want to eat healthy—to nourish your body with the nutrition it needs to feel good. But then actually figuring out how to eat healthy, or healthier, isn’t always so clear or intuitive. In fact, it's really freaking confusing sometimes. First off, there are a lot of opinions and information (and misinformation) out there, so it’s hard to know what to listen to. And diet culture has skewed a lot of our thinking about what healthy eating advice should sound like—often pushing restriction and prescriptive rules that don’t take into account the personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that influence what a healthy diet looks like for any one individual. Connected to that is the assumption, largely fueled by fat phobia, that healthy eating is synonymous with eating to lose weight. In other words: If you’re a little lost on how to eat healthy, it’s not you. So we looked to 11 R.D.s from a variety of backgrounds, personally and professionally, for their best tips on healthy eating that are flexible and empowering, instead of rigid and punishing. They shared practical pieces of advice that can make it easier for people to enrich and diversify the nutrition in their diets and make their own delicious, satisfying meals—as well as, just importantly, cultivate a more peaceful and enjoyable relationship with food and eating. Take the tips that speak to you, and add them to your very own one-of-a-kind healthy eating toolbox. 1. Say no thank you to one-size-fits-all diets. “Diet culture is inherently homogenizing with its wide, sweeping health recommendations and generic weight loss prescriptions. Not only are we incredibly diverse on a nutritional level, we're exponentially more complex on a health level. So if someone is telling you they discovered the right diet for most bodies, you can take that as a signal that this is not based in science and it is probably going to take you further away from yourself.” —Lindsay Birchfield M.S, RD, L.D., health and body activist and dietitian at Creating Peace with Food and Rooted Heart Health Care 2. Make a list of your values and look at how well your relationship to food aligns with them. “This is something I often talk about, because it’s so insightful for understanding our motivations and behaviors. Some examples of important values might be: open-mindedness, honesty, respect, or kindness, among many others. Try to connect your actions around food or eating to your values to see whether they uphold them or not. For example, if you value honesty but you aren’t being honest with yourself about your food preferences, there is tension there that may be harming your relationship with food or your long-term wellbeing. Additionally, if you value respect yet you are not respecting your body’s energy needs or cravings for certain foods, you may notice some opportunities to make changes. If you attempt this, be sure to stay grounded in a place of non-judgment; this exercise is intended to cultivate curiosity only without inflicting further guilt or shame for what you might uncover in the process.” —Cara Harbstreet, M.S. R.D. L.D. of Street Smart Nutrition 3. Include social and cultural connection in your experience of eating. "If your idea of healthy eating only focuses on the nutrient density of foods and you find yourself thinking about food all day long even when you believe you’ve eaten enough, you may be missing one or all of these key ingredients: Pleasure, satisfaction, and social connection. Expand your definition of healthy eating by including these key ingredients into your meal choices whenever possible. Try scheduling a Zoom meal with friends or family while you reminisce on the good times. Recreate your favorite childhood meals to bring back fond memories and a pleasurable eating experience. Or for variety and comforting nostalgia, incorporate recipes and ingredients from your culture into your meals.” —Ayana Habtemariam, M.S.W., R.D.N., L.D.N., Nutrition Therapist and Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor 4. Find adjectives to describe your food besides “healthy” and “unhealthy.” “Get creative with how you describe or think about your food. Typically, we’re used to thinking about food in organized categories like ‘healthy’ or ‘unhealthy,’ ‘good’ or ‘bad.’ But these labels can promote either an all-or-nothing pattern (where you think you shouldn’t have certain foods if they aren’t considered healthy or good) or a cycle of guilt and shame if you enjoy foods you consider less nourishing. Instead, I encourage you to get as creative as you can with how you describe your food. Make a list of as many descriptive words (spicy, savory, crunchy, melty, etc.) as you can. This can point you towards your true food preferences versus the food rules you absorbed from diet culture.” —Cara Harbstreet, M.S. R.D. L.D. 5. Make sure you’re actually eating enough throughout the day. "The most important aspect of healthy eating is whether you're eating enough. Sounds basic, but so many people are going long stretches of time without eating during the day, either because it's the latest diet fad, or because they get wrapped up in what they're doing.You'll feel much more alert and energized if you're eating something every three to four hours or so throughout the day." —Rachael Hartley, R.D., certified intuitive eating counselor and owner of Rachael Hartley Nutrition 6. Rely on convenient chef’s helpers to speed up cooking. “Maximizing your time in the kitchen is so important, especially as we all are navigating uncharted waters. Using basic items like triple-washed and bagged greens or pre-chopped veggies cuts prep time in half. And brands like Brooklyn Delhi or Saffron Road have incredibly flavorful simmer sauces that bring life to any dish in under five minutes. A close friend just brought me some of the Brooklyn Dehli achar sauces, and I am a new convert—and the ingredient list is amazing.” —Maya Feller, M.S., R.D., C.D.N. of Brooklyn-based Maya Feller Nutrition, Good Morning America nutrition expert, and author of The Southern Comfort Food Diabetes Cookbook: Over 100 Recipes for a Healthy Life 7. Try mindful eating. even if just for a single bite. “Practicing mindful eating can help us reclaim some of the joy of eating, and allows us to discover our actual food preferences. Mindful eating is turning attention to the senses—the sight, smell, feel, and taste of a food. To eat mindfully means we take the time to really experience the foods we eat. I always say to people start small, with just one mindful bite! So…to start, take a few deep breaths as you prepare to really taste your food. Take a moment to notice the color, the smell, the texture, and just take one bite. Take your time letting it sit on your tongue, chewing slowly, allowing your taste buds to take it all in. That’s all you need to do. You might notice that the food tastes different when you actually allow yourself to taste it.” —Erica Leon, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.N., Nutrition Therapist and Certified Eating Disorder Registered Dietitian 8. Focus on including more foods, not taking foods out. “Think about foods to add in rather than take out. It’s very popular and on-trend to want to consistently remove foods or food groups (like carbohydrates or fruit), but that will only make most people feel as though they are ‘obsessive’ with food. You can still eat what you like, but maybe think about adding some veggies on top of your pizza or on the side for balance, for example. I had a client who loved instant ramen noodles. I told her to keep the noodles, but add in some protein for staying power (such as grilled chicken, tofu, or beans) and throw in some chopped spinach and bell peppers for veggies. Adding in, not taking away.” —Shana Minei Spence, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.N., founder of The Nutrition Tea 9. Add more of dietitians’ favorite f-word to your diet. “Fiber is integral to gut health. Not only is fiber responsible for keeping you regular, but it's also integral to helping your body colonize its good gut bacteria. Adding fiber-rich foods to your daily routine can be quite simple. Try an ancient grain like bulgur (which has almost 30 percent of the DV for fiber) or barley.” — Maya Feller, M.S., R.D., C.D.N. 10. Don’t worry so much about “eating the rainbow.” “We often feel like we need to make our plates super colorful by adding veggies, but so many veggies aren't necessarily colorful. I think it's time to rethink that. Even if your plate is super monotone, don't worry—add the veggie that goes with the dish and will complement it. For example, I grew up eating Dominican meals, where we have a lot of root veggies such as yuca, yautia, and malanga. Not colorful at all, but loaded with nutrition. If you can, try new and different veggies, regardless of color.” —Dalina Soto M.A., R.D., L.D.N., bilingual dietitian and founder of Nutritiously Yours and Your Latina Nutrition 11. Go for more regular ol’ veggies over trendy superfoods. “If you just do one thing, add more vegetables. Just regular vegetables. The majority of Americans don't meet the recommended daily intake for vegetables. And while it's fun to explore superfood powders and special drinks for better health, simply adding an extra cup of an everyday vegetable like roasted broccoli to dinner can help move the needle in a positive direction.” —Marisa Moore, M.B.A., R.D.N., L.D., Culinary and Integrative Dietitian 12. Skip the “healthy version” and eat the food you’re actually craving. “There is no need to compromise your taste buds with ‘alternative’ foods because we are told these are healthier—chickpea cookie dough, cauliflower anything, black bean brownies. When we are told we can’t have the real thing or feel that we have to ‘healthify’ everything, we then tend to think about those eliminated foods solely and think that we’re ‘obsessed’ with or ‘addicted’ to food. Instead, give yourself permission to eat the foods you like, including the foods you crave.” —Shana Minei Spence, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.N. 13. Seek out phytonutrients. (Ya know, plants!) “Phytonutrients are chemical compounds produced by plants, and are known to be beneficial to humans because they include antioxidants, which help protect the body from free radical damage. Fruits like blueberries are an excellent source of phytonutrients—blueberries contain anthocyanins and flavanols, which have been heavily researched for their cardioprotective capabilities. They can be enjoyed fresh or frozen and added to both sweet and savory meals. Or, spice up your meals with garlic and onions. When stored properly, they have a long shelf life.” —Maya Feller, M.S., R.D., C.D.N. 14. Eat if you’re hungry—even when it’s not “mealtime” yet. “Your body is not on a timer. Eat when you are hungry. I’ve heard of some people being hungry mid-morning, but thinking that they shouldn’t eat because it’s not officially lunch time. If you are hungry at 11 A.M., know that it’s okay to eat. Our bodies and their needs change daily (due to hormones, movement, activity, etc.). So just because you ate at 1 P.M. yesterday, does not mean there is anything wrong with you if you need food earlier today. We are not robots or machines that go off of an autopilot, we are indeed human.” —Shana Minei Spence, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.N. 15. Batch prep grains and veggies and mix and match them throughout the week. “This is a practical tip that makes it easy to build meals throughout the week without repeating the same recipe five times. Cook rice or quinoa and roast vegetables in bulk so you can easily add your favorite protein for a quick lunch or dinner bowl during the week. Mix and match to keep it interesting—toss the roasted vegetables onto pizza one night and serve alongside salmon the next. I also like to boil a batch of eggs at the beginning of the week to use for snacks and breakfast throughout the week.” —Marisa Moore, M.B.A. R.D.N. L.D. 16. Create some new food traditions for yourself. “Food is strongly tied to memories and experiences, but when our eating habits have been strongly driven by diets or dieting, we tend to lose those traditions. Think back to some of your positive memories with food and see if you can either recreate them or replicate them in new traditions. This might be as simple as selecting a new recipe once a week to developing an entirely new way of celebrating major holidays. This can be an empowering and fulfilling way to celebrate food beyond its nutrition capacity and create a new food culture that doesn’t involve dieting or restriction.” —Cara Harbstreet, M.S. R.D. L.D. 17. Use fresh herbs liberally. “The oils naturally present in fresh herbs like basil, parsley, and oregano add lots of flavor. Two tablespoons of fresh basil deliver about 25 percent of the Vitamin K you need in a day. And fresh parsley is not just a garnish—it’s a great source of vitamins A and C and an excellent source of Vitamin K. (Over 75 percent of the DV in one tablespoon!) Add fresh herbs generously to salads, make herbed vinaigrette to drizzle on fish, or add them to water.” —Marisa Moore, M.B.A., R.D.N., L.D. 18. Keep ingredients for go-to pantry meals in stock. "Keep ingredients on hand for a couple of tasty and nutritious pantry meals. That way, on days you don't have a chance to go to the grocery store or don't feel like cooking anything complicated, you've still got options. My favorite is pasta tossed with canned chickpeas and frozen spinach sauteed with lots of onion, garlic and chili flakes.” —Rachael Hartley, R.D. 19. Eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner foods whenever you darn well please. “Lose the labels. Ever notice how easily we categorize food into ‘breakfast/lunch/dinner’? This line of thinking can hold you back. A part of you is saying an ‘I can't…’ story, like ‘I can't eat this for breakfast.’ Some of my favorite breakfasts look more like lunch—a piece of hearty toast with mayo, tomato, basil, salt and pepper, for example. Likewise, cheesy eggs wrapped in a tortilla with any veggie I have on-hand is a fast dinner go-to for me. Then, I'll add in sides of fruit or my favorite bowl of cereal or dessert, depending on my cravings.” —Rebecca Scritchfield, R.D.N., author of Body Kindness 20. Roast frozen veggies for an easy, crispy side. “I love frozen veggies. They can be super affordable and last a while in the freezer. My fave thing to do is to load up on frozen brussels sprouts, green beans, broccoli, peas and carrots, and just throw them into dishes to add flavor and texture. The air fryer is my favorite kitchen gadget, so I roast a lot of these veggies in there tossed in olive oil, garlic salt, and parmesan cheese. Or, you can roast them in the oven until golden-brown. Such a crowd pleaser and super quick to make. ” —Dalina Soto M.A., R.D., L.D.N. 21. Meal prep regularly, but be chill about it. “Have a reliable meal prep routine to avoid overthinking, which can lead to a downward spiral of unhelpful stress and anxiety around eating. And be flexible in what you consider a ‘good enough’ meal prep effort, given your time and money resources. For example, I try to set a 30 minute timer on Friday nights and have a notepad at the ready. I open up my refrigerator and freezer, toss the moldy stuff to compost, quickly prep any fresh vegetable that may be on it's last leg (usually by sautéing, roasting, or making a quick base for chili or soup), and chop up any fruit to freeze and use later with baked oatmeal or smoothies. After that sprint, I usually have several ideas for the next set of meals and favorites to restock. The time I invest in less-than-perfect prep ahead pays off in dividends when I'm cruising through a busy week and all I need to do is reach for something that's practically prepped and get it on the plate. This actually gives me time to eat mindfully and enjoy the taste too!” —Rebecca Scritchfield, R.D.N. 22. When in doubt, put some fruit and nuts on it. “Add fresh fruit to a scoop of gelato or sorbet, or fresh fruit and nuts (like almonds or peanuts) to a scoop of ice cream for additional fiber and protein to help keep you feeling more satisfied. I personally love adding mango, berries and sliced almonds to my sweet treat. And I love blending granola and nut butter into my fruit smoothies. You get a mix of healthy fats and more fiber which will help keep you full for a longer period of time. It is also perfect for an on-the-go breakfast.” —Yasi Ansari, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D., National Media Spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and Assistant Director of Performance Nutrition for UC Berkeley Athletics Quotes have been edited for length and clarity. #HealthyEating #Produce

Are microgreens the new trend?

Are microgreens the new trend?

Microgreens sound pretty cute and healthy, right? Greens are great, and everything is better when you make a tiny version of it. But you might also wonder, what are microgreens, actually? So here’s what you need to know about what microgreens are, exactly. Plus, why people like them, what they taste like, their nutritional benefits, how to use them, how to grow them, and where to buy them. “Microgreens are an innovative category of vegetables harvested as tender immature greens,” Francesco Di Gioia, Ph. D., assistant professor of Vegetable Crop Science at the Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences, tells SELF. These teeny-tiny greens are the seedlings produced by sprouting the seeds of plants like vegetables, herbs, and some pseudograins (like amaranth and buckwheat), including wild edible species, Di Gioia says. Somewhere between a sprout and a baby veggie, microgreens are essentially the same plant you’d buy at the grocery store (like a veggie or herb), at a much earlier stage of growth, Tyler Matchett, cofounder of Splash of Greens, an urban microgreens farm in New Brunswick, Canada, tells SELF. “If left to grow, they would become a full-grown vegetable,” Matchett explains. But microgreens are typically harvested just one or two weeks after germination—and up to four, Di Gioia says, depending on the species—when the plant is just one to three inches tall. You snip off the portion of the seedling above the root, which includes the cotyledon (the initial leaf that sprouts out of the seed embryo), the stem, and the first “true leaves” of the plant. Bam, you’ve got a microgreen. “Microgreens are also called ‘vegetable confetti’ because they are tiny, beautiful greens characterized by a variety of colors and shapes, as well as by very different and intense, sometimes surprising, flavors,” Di Gioia says. There are hundreds of different varieties of microgreens. Pea, sunflower, broccoli, and radish microgreens are some of the most popular varieties among Matchett’s customers. Other varieties include beets, Swiss chard, cucumber, sweet pea, endive, savoy, Brussels sprouts, mustards, cauliflower, tatsoi, spinach, kohlrabi, mint, basil, sorrel, cauliflower, arugula, collard, fenugreek, carrot, mizuna, corn, turnip, chervil, celery, scallions, and komatsuna. You might be wondering what’s so fantastic about these itty-bitty greens. A few things, actually. 1. They’re yummy. First and foremost, these little guys can contribute a surprising amount of taste and texture to a dish. “A handful of microgreens can enrich very simple dishes, adding color, volume, and flavor at the same time,” Di Gioia says. “Chefs love them, and have been using them for years as garnish or a unique way to add flavor accents to a dish,” Matchett adds, noting they’re especially prized for their delicate texture and wide array of flavor notes. What they taste like, exactly, totally depends on the plant. “Microgreens can be mild, sweet, bitter, sour, or can generate more complex flavors in our mouths [like] spicy, peppery, or licorice,” Di Gioia says. “The flavor can almost be described as a more concentrated form of the vegetable,” Matchett explains. “A spicy radish, for example, will normally be spicier in its microgreen form. And you will get a wider taste profile, but you’ll still know it is radish—it's just the tastiest radish you've ever eaten.” 2. They’re nutritious. Microgreens can also add an extra dose of plant goodness to your meal. “Over the last few years, several studies have suggested that microgreens are nutrient-dense, being a good source of essential minerals, vitamins, and antioxidants,” Di Gioia says. While “there is a lot of variability between species and growing conditions,” as Di Gioia points out, generally speaking microgreens often have a greater concentration of these micronutrients than their full-grown counterparts, pound for pound. Many microgreens are four to six times higher in vitamins and antioxidants than the fully grown plant, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Health goals

Health goals

How to achieve our ultimate health goals? With the proper care, just like an organic or untreated tiny seed evolves into a luscious, delicious vegetable, the human body evolves into a happy, healthy & loving being. With the proper mindset, it’s a piece of cake (no pun intended) to achieve our ultimate health goals. Everyone is unique and has a different threshold as to what our personal health should look like. If you want to gain optimal health, feel great, and energized, follow these 5 simple tips. 1. Have purpose in mind 2. Write your goals down 3. Create a schedule and don’t derive from it 4. Eat nutrient-dense food 5. Implement recovery time The Holistic Nutrition Matrix's blog is about lifestyle, mindset, nutrition-dense foods, body energy, authenticity, self-integrity, self-preservation, growth, health goals, best life journey and greater purpose. We will explore and expand deeper on all of these subjects mentioned above as time go by. Join me on this fabulous adventure, subscribe to my blog!

What are nutrient-dense foods?

What are nutrient-dense foods?

Nutrient density is a measure of the number of nutrients a food contains in comparison to the number of calories. Food is more nutrient-dense when the level of nutrients is high in relationship to the number of calories the food contains. Nutrient-dense foods are rich in vitamins, minerals and other nutrients important for your health without too much saturated fat, added sugars and sodium: All organic fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish, proteins, legumes, nuts and seeds. Source: heart.org/nutraphoria.com

Best life journey

Best life journey

Note to self: Purity of heart & clarity of mind gives the surety for life… Stay committed to our decisions, but stay flexible in our approach… Ram Sharma, awgp.org Perhaps, we should be thankful just to awake every morning as we face the miracles of life. Everyday life itself is a gift. Greet the day to live your life’s best journey. Is the grass greener on the other side or is YOUR’S greener, full of abundance? With purity of the heart and clarity of the mind, create your personal garden of Eden full of abundance. Let it flourish, treat it well and nourish it. You reap what you sow, so plant good seeds and plant them well. Seeds will grow through adversity so can you! Stay committed to your decisions, stay your course but be ready to adjust as needed. Life is like a camera. Just focus on what’s important, capture the good times, develop from the negatives, and if things don’t work out, just take another shot. “Unknown” 5 points to help you stay committed to yourself: 1. Surround yourself with positive people with common goals 2. Write your life’s mission down and read it daily 3. Use nature to your advantage, it’s free 4. Invest time in yourself, and flourish: time to heal, time to learn, time to relax, time to exercise- time to be wholesome 5. Make a commitment to self, and stay on course

Greater purpose

Greater purpose

Discovering our greater purpose in life is very fulfilling. Many, amongst us don’t have a life purpose. Most folks will coast through life (that is OK) feeling content with the choices they have made when it comes to career or job, and that may be a life purpose of its own. However, if you are one of those people who feel alone, empty inside (lack of), or sense that there should be more to life, implementing a life purpose is be a good idea. During the 2020 COVID lockdown, I had time to reflect on that very statement, “There’s got to be more to this life." So, I decided to embark on a new path of self-fulfillment & discovery while publicly sharing my progress through this blog. Knowing where we want to be is not always easy to figure out. We currently live in a world of disparity in thoughts and opinions, media influence, confusion, lack of implication, and a world that is quick to judge. It is important t take time to pull back, consciously watch the movie that is unfolding all around us and ask ourselves the question, “Where do we fit in all this?” Pick a cause, a subject, a project, devote some time to it, learn from it, and maybe implicate yourself in it. Come clean, ride the wave, and enjoy the journey. Personally, to help me focus, stay the course, and to find where I want to be in the future, I used Jack Canfield’s principle #2, from his book; "The Success Principle." Through a specific exercise, I developed my mission statement. Here is the result: My life purpose (and the mission of this blog) is to use my energy & authenticity to promote self-integrity & self-preservation, and to help people trigger & awaken their power within, to achieve ONE’s health goals, best life journey, and greater purpose. Why are you here? What is your life purpose? Are you exactly where you want to be at this point in life? What are your aspirations? How to move forward in a post-pandemic era? How to inspire others? These are all questions I will write about in this blog, and then some. If you would like to see more and read more, show your support, subscribe to my blog, and share your thoughts, it’s free! PS: The cover picture is a pic of myself doing a headstand, taken in 2006 in an era where I began using a more flexible perspective, looking at life from all dimensions and embarked on a path to seek new knowledge. My conclusion: Life is a complex, perplexing predicament to be explored until my last breath.